Blog

An Alternative to Sustainable Raw Materials : Bioplastics

Feb 05, 2024
An Alternative to Sustainable Raw Materials : Bioplastics

Textile and design fields have great impact areas in terms of consumption due to the sectoral dynamics they harbour. At the point where the world and the sectors have reached, it is inevitable that these effects are sustainability-oriented. Materials allow artists and designers to create new narrative languages in all design disciplines and enable new approaches. At this point where greener alternatives to conventional raw materials are sought, it is possible to evaluate bio-based materials. Bio-based textiles are basically divided into two groups: fibres produced from natural fibres of animal and plant origin and cellulose-based man-made fibres.

One of the biggest advantages of biomaterials in the concept of sustainability is biodegradability. The concept of biodegradability is explained as the biodegradation of the material with the help of microorganisms, the sun and other natural factors, and its participation in the natural cycle by turning into water, carbon dioxide and methane. Bioplastics participate in biomaterials as a new concept. These are plastics obtained from sources such as microorganisms, vegetable oils and starches. The advantages it brings to the sector are its adaptation to the concept of sustainability in terms of production and consumption, low carbon footprint and renewability. Biowaste materials can be listed as wood, paper, forest and agricultural wastes and can be used as fibre in the textile field or as non-woven surface. The main examples of the use of bioplastics and biowastes in textile structures are as follows;

  • The "Deterra Jacket" product developed by the Swedish Outdoor brand Tierra was developed with 100% bio-based material EVO and became the first technical outdoor jacket produced using 100% biomaterial.
  • Developed by DuPont, "Sorona" is a high-performance fabric used in the Chinese Olympic Team uniforms.
  • Salvatore Ferragamo design house has prepared a collection with "Orange Fibre" product obtained from citrus waste.
  • S-Cafe fabrics obtained from coffee wastes of Singtex company attract attention among biomaterials with their odour absorbing feature.
  • AlgiKnit designs knitted fabrics using algae as bioplastics.
  • Pinatex company has created a leather alternative nonwoven surface with waste leaves from pineapple harvests and developed a product that can be used in many areas such as furniture, upholstery and shoes.
  • A collection developed by Suzanne Lee from bacterial cellulose has been prepared. By using bacteria, yeast, algae and fungi together, it brings an alternative for a sustainable future.
  • In the leather designs developed by Mycoworks company, root-like fibre found in mushrooms is used. This production model, which does not cause the death of any living creature during production and whose wastes can be used as fertiliser, stands out with its sustainability feature.

As a result, bioplastics and wastes, which are still not at a sufficient level in terms of high capacity production, will become widespread in the future with the meeting of technology and nature at a common point. These new and exciting materials will be a part of our lives in the future dynamics with their natural basis and design potential.

Posted by Abiteks

HIGHLIGHTED BLOG POSTS

Denim for the Earth: Embracing Sustainable Jeans
May 13, 2024
Denim for the Earth: Embracing Sustainable Jeans
Denim for the Earth: Embracing Sustainable Jeans
READ MORE
Circular Fashion
Apr 18, 2021
Circular Fashion
Introducing circular fashion: the shopping concept that could save the planet The industry’s popular new idea could finally be an authentic way of reconciling a love of fashion with sustainability.
READ MORE
Upcycling
Mar 04, 2024
Upcycling
Upcycling
READ MORE
SUBSCRIBETo Our Newsletter